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Like ants waiting for the perfect weather conditions that a single day brings, thousands of abandoned shopping trolleys rose from canals, rivers and ponds to ride the water surface on their new whisker-like legs. 

They gathered in groups. Those dumped in the sea moved to estuaries and river mouths to find their new spawning grounds. Some had been submerged for decades, their chromed wire bodies flaking and pocked with rust, wheels frozen and trailing the remains of carrier bags and weed. Tesco, Sainsburys, Waitrose, together in this new collective. An order determined by breeze, ripple patterns and elemental tension, touched them all. 

No longer pushed, packed in awkward rows or spun in empty carparks, they moved effortlessly in their new world between air and water. A younger M&S trolley still proudly stating “ the adventure starts here” on its flanks, skittered and spun in the morning sun. A stately jumbo trolley possibly from the 1980s, with child seat proudly open, moved like a galleon, its remaining chrome sending rays of bright reflection over the still water.